Washington Association of
Professional Anthropologists
 

Activities and Events

Members can post announcements regarding activities and events of interest to WAPA members.  To access a list of recent posts on your web browser links bar, click on the RSS feed button above, then click on "subscribe now."  Items posted in this section can be viewed by the public.
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  • 21 May 2017 6:37 AM | WAPA Communications (Administrator)

    WAPA May Happy Hour

    May 25, 2017

    5:30-7:30 PM

    Mackey’s Public House, 1306 G St NW, Washington, DC 20005

     Come to our reinstated WAPA happy hour this Thursday at Mackey’s Public House at 1306 G Street NW, the former location of the Laughing Man Tavern. Note that Mackey’s has moved, and this is NOT the old location where we have had happy hours before. Metro Center is the closest metro station. Reduced price drinks and appetizers will be available until 7:00. I hope everyone can come out to meet and reconnect. Open to all.

  • 29 Apr 2017 7:34 AM | WAPA Communications (Administrator)

    YOU’RE INVITED… 

    WAPA CARES ETHNOGRAPHY MEETING 

    Sunday, April 30th, 2017

    3-5 P.M. 

    Home of Greyson Harris in Petworth

     

    4309 Kansas Ave. NW, Apt. B

    *Blue house, second door on left

    Washington, DC 20011

     

    Greyson’s Cell:

    530-410-5569

     

    *Feel free to bring snacks or drinks

     

     

    Dear WAPA Ethnography Participants;

    After many discussions between the Purpose Statement, Methodology, and Literature Review groups, we will meet this Sunday to update the entire group. Please forward this email to anyone you don't see on the list who should be. We will update the list at the meeting! 

    There is still much to be discussed and planned if we hope to start interviews in mid-June, but I am confident that we can hash this out together and vote on some of the ideas.

    You will find below a draft purpose statement for the Virginia Ethnography. It is not yet set in stone, nor is the title, so I have asked Greyson to set up an overhead projector where we can look at those and the interview questions in order to discuss and make changes on the spot. The methodology is not yet ironed out, but I think we will get there once the group shares some of their ideas.

    At the meeting, we will figure out which online platform to use for information sharing, and we will place all relevant documents, including a spreadsheet for the literature review there. Please be patient as we have a mutli-generational group with diverse digital skills.

    What is clear is that the faster we get a well-thought-out but simple pilot on the ground, the more likely we are to be able to insert some of our findings in an interactive website, and even start adding a few photos and short video clips with compelling interviews. This is crucial if we want to have an impact beyond academia.

    While lots of us are progressive anthropologists, I think there is a general understanding that we are doing this as a listening project to reflect the complexity of thinking in a swing state like Virginia, so that the public can develop more understanding, empathy, and ultimately feel more empowered about whatever political and civic engagement decisions they make.


    Julienne Gage

    305-527-0504


     


  • 12 Apr 2017 1:43 PM | Laurie Krieger (Administrator)

    Tuesday, May 2 at 7 pm at The Sumner School

    Dinner/happy hour starting at 5:30 pm at the Mayflower Hotel restaurant (behind the bar)

    Our final speaker of the year will be Tony Whitehead, Ph.D., Ms.Hyg., Professor Emeritus, Anthropology University of Maryland

    The title of his talk will be:

    "Is Anthropology Just for White People?  Deconstructing Institutionalized Racism in an Academic Department"

    Dr. Whitehead describes his talk:

    I am currently trying to complete the writing of a professional and personal memoir tentatively titled The Education and Emancipation of a Negro Anthropologist: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly and the Bullshit, and this presentation takes excerpts from the Bad, the Ugly, and the Bullshit sections of that manuscript. But after receiving the invitation from WAPA, I have decided to also use this presentation to initiate a larger study that asks one major research question: “How are some academic departments allowed to practice decades of admitting very few African American graduate students, or hiring very few African American faculty within universities that have long espoused student and faculty diversity?” The focus here is on Anthropology, with a secondary research question: “If Anthropology is the study of human diversity, would not the discipline be enhanced through training a diverse pool of anthropologists?”

     This project takes into consideration that anthropology has not had a natural attraction to most African American students, and those of other non-white groups. Similarly, in many cases, it has not been a field that parents of color have seen as an attractive profession for their children, usually because of perceptions of a lack employment opportunities, or livable salaries. However, a number of senior anthropologists, particularly those of color, have written about the institutionalized racism that operates in graduate school admissions and hiring practices excluding students and faculty of color even when they do apply. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that there are pervasive institutional attitudes and practices that contribute to a persistence of whiteness in those departments, as well as in the discipline as a whole.  At the same time, most anthropologists, including those based in academic departments, have built their individual careers, and the field as a whole, predominantly through ongoing studies of peoples of color.

     This WAPA presentation will focus on one specific department, drawing on its record of graduate admissions and faculty hiring, and the observations and experiences of the only two African American anthropologists hired in the department over a 30-year period. For the larger study, I propose: (1) to locate and interview the few African American graduate students who completed the department’s master’s degree over that same period (none have been admitted into the Department’s PhD program in its 10-year history); (2) to conduct an additional literature analysis of works by other senior anthropologists (to gain longer historical perspectives; and (3) if time permits, conduct interviews of some of those authors. Among the issues explored will be examples of impacts on the health, and personal and professional well- being of faculty members of color negotiating their survival and success in these white cultural spaces. Beyond the issue of race, other factors will also be explored, which might help us better understand a range of factors that contribute to persistent whiteness within a discipline that owes so much to human diversity, and perhaps come up with more effective strategies both within and beyond the discipline to address the human wages of persistent whiteness.

    Tony Whitehead, Ph.D., Ms. Hyg.

    Tony Whitehead is Anthropology Professor Emeritus, University of Maryland College Park (UMCP), where he was a full-time faculty member for 27 years (1987-2014), spending the first five years as Department as Chair. Prior to coming to UMCP, he served for 11 ½ years as a faculty member in the University of North Carolina’s (UNC) School of Public Health. While serving (1982-1983) as president of the Association of Black Anthropologists (ABA), he initiated the action that led to the ABA becoming a formal unit of the AAA. Early In his tenure (1989-90) as Anthropology Chair, he found the Cultural Systems Analysis Group (CuSAG), an applied ethnographic research center, offering research, program planning, implementation, and evaluation assistance to local, national, and international organizations committed to addressing health and other human service needs. Primarily through external research funding, CuSAG persisted for 25 years, ending with his retirement. He has broad research and technical assistance experiences in the United States, the Caribbean, Africa, and Europe, related to: (1) reproductive health topics such as adolescent motherhood, men, masculinity, and family planning, and HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases; (2) chronic conditions such as hypertension, arthritis, and cancer, diet, and obesity, food and culture; (3) urban issues such as drugs, violence, crime, incarceration, and community reentry; and (4) the design, implementation, and evaluation of community health and development programs. Over his career, his research and technical assistance activities have received funding from the Russell Sage, Rockefeller, and Annie E. Casey Foundations, the National Research Council, the Agency for International Development, the Centers for Disease Control, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society, Health Resources and Services Administration, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institutes of Child Health and Development, the National Park Service, and local health care agencies such as the Baltimore City and Prince Georges County Health Departments, the AIDS Administration of the Maryland State Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and the Liberty Medical Center of Baltimore, Maryland.  At UMCP, he was co-founder of the graduate training track, The Anthropology of Community, Health, and Development (ACHD), which morphed into the current Health Area of Concentration. Over his career, he has published two books and three dozen journal articles and book chapters. At retirement, he initiated the UMCP-HBCU Scholarship Fund (which is now being disbanded), established a website for his many un-peer reviewed papers and projects for global access while he is currently reorganizing into a monograph series titled, Coding, Reading, and Writing Culture as an Interpretive and Applied Human Science.

  • 08 Mar 2017 5:49 PM | Suzanne Heurtin-Roberts

    You are invited to:

    Coping with the New Administration and Congress: WAPA Cares

    • Type of Event: Salon


    • Time: 3-5pm


    • Date March 12
    • Where:  7423 Buffalo Ave. Takoma Park, Maryland (Home of Judith Freidenberg)
    • Follow-up to original meeting on February 2. We will  organize into workgroups and continue with our discussions
    • Organized by Dr. Judith Friedenberg, UMD, College Park, and Suzanne Heurtin-Roberts, a medical anthropologist living in Silver Spring, MD


  • 30 Jan 2017 9:32 AM | Suzanne Heurtin-Roberts


    Coping with the New Administration and Congress:  Anthropologists and the People we Work With

    Come join us for an important WAPA Meetup-Salon.  We are meeting to discuss what we as anthropologists can do to promote the common good in the context of the Trump administration and new Congress.  We will discuss both what we as anthropologists can do and what we as an organization want to put out to the public. Anyone is welcome to attend.

    Type of Event: WAPA Meetup-Salon

     Thursday, February 2, 2017

    7-9pm

     Location: Judith Freidenberg's home, 7423 Buffalo Avenue, Takoma Park, MD 20912

     Phone:  301 502 0927; 301 922 6788

     Hosted by:   Dr. Judith Freidenberg, UMD, College Park, and  Dr. Suzanne Heurtin-Roberts, a medical anthropologist living in Silver Spring, MD.

  • 21 Dec 2016 4:24 PM | Laurie Krieger (Administrator)

    Save the Date!  WAPA Winter Party

    WHEN:  January 29, starting at 5 pm

    WHERE: The lovely home of Adam Koons and Yukari Horibe in Silver Spring

    (easy to get to; rides will be available from Glenmont Metro)

     Stay tuned for further information

                                                                      

  • 14 Oct 2016 10:07 AM | Anonymous

    What: Judith Freidenberg, professor of anthropology at the University of Maryland and director of The Anthropology of the Immigrant Life Course Research Program, will be reading selections from her latest book, Contemporary Conversations on Immigration in the United States: The View from Prince George's County, Maryland published by Lexington Books.

    When: October 25, 2016, from 7 to 9 p.m.

    Where: Busboys and Poets
    5331 Baltimore Avenue
    Hyattsville, MD 20781

     


    This event is a partnership between the AAA and Creative Edge Collaborative to support the AAA's public education project World on the Move: 100,000 Years of Human Migration, designed to offer people a chance to pause and rethink their ideas about migration, displacement, and belonging. To learn more about the initiative visit www.understandingmigration.org.


  • 03 Aug 2016 10:09 AM | Anonymous

    The American Anthropological Association would like to inform you of our forthcoming sponsored event sponsored that may be of interest to your community.

    "Worker-Mothers on the Margins of Europe" A World on the Move Event will be held at Busboys and Poets (1025 5th Street Northwest) on August 25 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. The event will feature a reading by cultural anthropologist Leyla Keough, whose latest ethnography follows Moldovan women who "commute" for six to twelve months to work as domestics in Istanbul, Turkey. The book explores the world of undocumented migrants from a post-socialist state, examines the gender expectations and moral economies that shape the perspectives of the migrants, and highlights the structural economic barriers that have pushed these women to be “seasonal migrants.” Guests may register for this free event here: http://bit.ly/WorkerMothers.

    Leyla Keough is an adjunct assistant professor of cultural anthropology at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts. Outside of academia, Dr. Keough has served as a development associate at a refugee resettlement agency in Boston, consultant to the International Organization for Migration, and writer and editor for Encyclopaedia Africana.

    We think that this event may be of broad interest to members of your community, and invite you to share the attached flyer and link to the event registration page through your own communications channels. If you would like more information, please don’t hesitate to reach out to Anne Kelsey via email at akelsey@americananthro.org , or give me a call at 703-528-1902 ext. 1183.


  • 23 Jun 2016 10:07 AM | Anonymous

    World on the Move: 100,000 Years of Human Migration,  the American Anthropological Association’s (AAA) latest public education initiative, will be showcased as part of On the Move: Migration and Immigration Today, a series of workshops being presented at the 2016 Smithsonian Folklife Festival from June 29 through July 7 on the National Mall.

    Conversations about migration and immigration often focus more on ideology and rhetoric than on actual experiences. Through World on the Move: 100,000 Years of Human Migration, the AAA is trying to change the conversation by helping people understand how we all create borders in our lives with attitudes and misconceptions of “the other.”

    AAA staff and volunteers will use structured scenarios to help Folklife Festival visitors reflect on and embody the experience of migrants, asking visitors to consider what mechanisms, tools, and resources they would use to cope in a new community. The event is being held in cooperation with the Smithsonian Institution and its partners, including the Alliance for California Traditional Arts, American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, Basque Library of the University of Nevada, Basque Museum and Cultural Center, National Museum of American History, Radio Bilingüe, and others.  

    Workshops scheduled over the course of the festival will address different elements of the migration experience including:

    • Objects on the Move: What would you take with you if you suddenly had to move?
      June 29 at 1:00 p.m. and July 7 at 2:00 p.m.
    • Families on the Move: If you were to move, how would you cope with your new surroundings?
      July 1 at 3:00 p.m. and July 9 at 1:00 p.m.

    View the full workshop schedule for On the Move here.

    World on the Move: 100,000 Years of Human Migration is designed to offer people a chance to pause and rethink their ideas about migration, displacement, and belonging. To learn more about the initiative visit www.understandingmigration.org.

    - - AAA - -
    Founded in 1902, the American Anthropological Association, with almost 10,000 members, is the world’s largest professional organization of anthropologists. The Association is dedicated to advancing human understanding and tackling the world’s most pressing problems


  • 07 Jun 2016 7:00 PM | Anonymous

    What: The American Anthropological Association (AAA) invites you to hear Elzbieta M. Gozdziak, research professor for the Institute for the Study of International Migration (ISIM) at Georgetown University, read selections from her latest book, Trafficked Children and Adolescents in the United States: Reimagining Survivors published by Rutgers University Press.

    When: June 7, 2016 from 7 to 9 p.m.

    Where: Busboys and Poets
    625 Monroe Street Northeast 
    Washington, DC 20017

    Trafficked children are portrayed by the media - and even by child welfare specialists - as hapless victims who are forced to migrate from a poor country to the United States, where they serve as sex slaves. But as Gozdziak reveals in Trafficked Children in the United States, the picture is far more complex. Basing her observations on research with 140 children from countries all over the globe, Gozdziak debunks many myths and uncovers the realities of the captivity, rescue, and rehabilitation of trafficked children.

    For more information about the event, and to RSVP, visit http://bit.ly/WOTM_TraffickedChildren.

    To schedule an interview with Dr. Gozdziak, contact the American Anthropological Association at 703-528-1902.

    This event is presented in collaboration with AAA’s latest public education initiative World on the Move: 100,000 Years of Human Migration, designed to offer people a chance to pause and rethink their ideas about migration, displacement, and belonging. To learn more about the initiative visit www.understandingmigration.org.



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